HIRA KHAN - ON HER JOURNEY FROM TECH TO ACTING

HIRA KHAN - ON HER JOURNEY FROM TECH TO ACTING

Hira Khan or more commonly known as ‘Roomi’ from ‘Mere Humsafar’ is a newer yet incredible actor that we had the pleasure of interviewing. Most of you may not know this but Hira is not only 'Miss Veet Pakistan' 2017 but is also a talented tech girl after having graduated from London School of Economics. Read on to know more interesting details about her life journey as she shares her struggles.

Hello Hira! Before we start, can you tell us a bit about yourself and how you came to join the acting industry?

Hello! I would describe myself as someone who knows what she wants and never stops working for it. I believe in the magic of small acts and as my Instagram bio says: ‘More Faith Than Logic’ is my mantra of life.

Acting was always a dream – coming from a family with no acting background felt like something impossible but life took its course and it happened. It was luck by chance I would say.

What would you say are pros and cons of being an actor?

Honestly,


I am living the dream. Making a living out of something you love and look forward to everyday is a blessing


but this work requires your blood and sweat. It is a lifestyle. Your life needs to have discipline in order to get where you want to be. Also, there’s never a fix schedule so any day it can be a crazy unexpected 48-hour shoot with no breaks.

Did you always plan on acting, especially considering you took part in modelling work such as winning ‘Miss Veet’ and also have a Bsc in Digital Innovation and Management?

'Miss Veet' wasn’t only about modelling else I wouldn’t have won with this height. (Pun intended) It was a grooming contest that challenged your physical and mental capabilities and forced you to come out of your comfort zone.


Acting wasn’t a plan but a dream. So grateful that it happened.


Your character in ‘Mere Humsafar’ recently touched hearts with a specific conversation highlighting child neglect. Did you struggle in performing that scene?

I had real tears in my eyes while I was performing the scene because I could channel my unresolved feelings.


I too felt neglected in my teens because my parents were going through a rough patch. I think maybe the audiences felt it too.


However, I was happy to convey a message through my craft.

What do you do in your free time? Do you have any hobbies or de- stressing activities?

My free time is about catching up on sleep and cooking. I missed homemade food so much in Karachi that I also have now learned to cook. Also, I am a bookworm and these days I am reading about screenplays and acting.

Did you relate in any way to your character in ‘Mere Humsafar’?

Yes I do. I always wanted to get married in my teens. I always wanted more attention than anyone but I wasn’t this naïve about it.


I think every college/ school girl can relate to it because every kid has a reason of how and why they behave a certain way.


It’s just some unresolved business that reflects in their actions.

You’ve previously spoken about your struggles in finding a study- work balance during your degree program from London School of Economics. How did you eventually juggle that and what advice would you give to other students facing similar issues?

This definitely was a struggle. I had transferred my degree to the online programme because I was constantly traveling back and forth for work. Also, Covid happened so that was a blessing in disguise for me. I would advise everyone to at least figure out what is their calling, passion and choose a relevant degree for starters.

 

You’ve mostly done somewhat negative roles in your projects from ‘Phaans’ to ‘Mere Humsafar’. Is there any specific reason behind that?

'Phaans' was my first major project so I wanted to start off with something having substance and I was casted in 'Mere Humsafar' because of that. I would always choose to be anything but a crying victim with no margin to play as an actor.

You’re very close to your mother. What is one advice of hers that’s always stuck with you?

Never give up on your integrity.

There are no shortcuts to life and success. When somebody takes the stairs up, they’ll have to come down by them too. Overnight success and fame wont last forever.

What kind of struggles have you faced in your path to joining the industry?

No institutions to guide or train you. No connections to get into the production houses. Everything on your own and through Google and friends who got in.

Lastly, where do you see yourself five years from now?

This is a funny question. Last time, I answered it with 'somewhere on the billboards' and that happened a year later. This quote by Oscar Wild has stuck with me ever since I read it ‘When know what you want to be, then you inevitably become it - that is your punishment, but if you never know, then you can be anything’.


I want life to surprise me and. I want to see myself content, learning and striving for my inner calling.


 

RAPID FIRE

Favourite drink?

Apple Juice

One thing that’s always in your bag?

Perfume

Hira khan in three adjectives?

Conscientious, empowered, hustler

Cats or Dogs?

Dogs

Sleep in or go out?

Sleep in any day!

Best movie of all time?

Drooling over 'RRR' these days. It keeps changing

Childhood nickname?

Pons

One thing we may not know about you?

I am big on grocery shopping

Favourite Netflix show?

'FRIENDS'

Now for the most important question, biryani with or without 'aloo'?

I have become a Karachi girl now so with 'aloo'


INTERVIEW: HANIA SEHR

STYLING: STYLISTS IN THE CAPITAL

WARDROBE: HSY, MAHEEN KHAN

JEWELLERY: MISH&CO

PHOTOGRAPHY & STUDIO: YASSER SADIQ

HAIR & MAKEUP: NARJIS TAQI

ON-SET COORDINATION: UMAMAH ASIF BURNEY

  • In: Fashion